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les presses du réel

Mousse n° 69

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Lean on Me: Nairy Baghramian by Andrew Berardini
Nairy Baghramian's sculptures are held together with surprising humor and spatial intelligence. Angular and sensual, animal and inanimate, ethereal yet freighted with the gravitas of physical presence, they sometimes reflect back on themselves as loose, provisional sketches.

All That Scrawl: Toward a Wild Writing by Travis Jeppesen
To Travis Jeppesen, scrawl is more than just scratches on a surface. It is, at the very least, both an attempt at and a theory of narrative—a theory that attempts to link narrative with the material means of its enunciation.

A Telepathic Understanding of Form: Nobuo Sekine by Hans Ulrich Obrist
In a posthumously published interview with Hans Ulrich Obrist, Nobuo Sekine overviews his long career and practice, which contended with abstract space and considered form, material, and space as malleable entities.

And:
Avery Singer discusses with Kathy Noble her approach to the languages, tools, and processes of painting, analyzing the medium's position within institutions of artistic and cultural power.

David Ostrowski and Tenzing Barshee examine painting—its successful resistance to anachronism, and how the many waves of the post-digital turn don't seem to undermine its factual contemporaneity.

John Gerrard in conversation with Defne Ayas explores his recent endeavors related to machines' processing capabilities and neural networks.

“When my grandmother sees the baby, she becomes emotional, though she does not yet seem to understand who any of us are.” A short tale spanning birth, life, and death by Ren Ebel.

Moritz Scheper, Fiona McGovern, Megan Francis Sullivan, and Axel Wieder retrace Jill Johnston's extensive contributions bridging various cultural fields—journalism, dance, and feminism—since the 1970s.

Jordan Wolfson met his artistic “unsung hero,” Eric Wesley, and chatted about symmetry and asymmetry; materials; and a certain attitude in decor as an “adult contemporary” gestalt.

Tyler Coburn and Elvia Wilk, whose practices both deal with materiality, embodiment, and speculative futures, discuss how new materialist philosophies have led them to reconsider very old viewpoints.

Alice Bucknell explores the practices of various contemporary artists who combine mysticism with advanced technology, enabling them to reimagine alternative futures through ancient belief systems.
 


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