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Drawing Room Confessions #5
Benoît Maire [see all titles]
Mousse [see all titles] Mousse Publishing (books) [see all titles]
Benoît Maire Drawing Room Confessions #5
published in 2012
English edition
11 x 17 cm (softcover)
52 pages (b/w ill.)
ISBN: 978-88-6749-003-5
EAN: 9788867490035
out of print
 
Benoît Maire plays the Drawing Room Confessions.
THE CAST
BENOÎT...........................Benoît Maire
THE EGOIST...................Clémentine Autain
THE BLIND MAN.............Falke Pisano
TANGO...........................Mark Geffriaud

(…) It could be linked to something like responsibility, in the sense that, when you create a work, you're the only person responsible for its existence vis-a-vis a third party, or an audience. You are simultaneously also responsible for an ideology, because a work is still a position with respect to the real and is therefore an ideology. Whereas the act of reducing oneself to a pathetic state makes you irresponsible. You put responsibility on the shelf.I was drunk, so I acted like an idiot. I'm forgiven. I had the right to act like an idiot. (…)
Drawing Room Confessions is a printed journal named after a parlour game played by Marcel Proust, the Surrealists and others. It is made of words and exchanges, with no images. Six different sections (The Egoist, The Blind Man, Two to Tango, Ekphrasis, Time Line and La Madeleine) comprise the Rules of the Game, which are the same in each issue. What changes are the players, or interviewers, who open each round of conversation with the featured artist and who come from a wide range of fields.
Since 2008 Benoît Maire (born 1978 in Pessac, France, lives and works in Paris) has started writing a manual of aesthetics where images, objects and writing take form to bring forth some of contemporary aesthetics' main issues. Starting from the differend (insurmountable conflict) between saying and seeing, Benoît Maire works in an in-between where art and philosophy merge into a practical use where forms spread out and surpass one another. Neither philosophy, nor art, the Aesthetics of differends looks to corrupt classical formats by the experimental use of theory.