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Stream #04 – Les paradoxes du vivant
Stream [see all issues]
  Stream Les paradoxes du vivant
Contributions by Augustin Berque, Anita Berrizbeitia, Michel Blazy, Gilles Boeuf, Timothée Boitouzet, Dominique Boullier, Philippe Chiambaretta, Gilles Clément, Anna Dyson, David Edwards, Olafur Eliasson, Yona Friedman, Loris Gréaud, Graham Harman, Ariane Lourie Harrison, Jens Hauser, Donald Ingber, Haru Ji, François Képès, Eduardo Kohn, Catherine Larrère, Raphaël Larrère, Laurent Le Bon, Ariane Michel, Carlos Moreno, Timothy Morton, Catherine Mosbach, Léa Mosconi, Pierre Musso, Joseph Paradiso, Laurent Petit, Jana Revidin, Roland Schaer, Thomas Schlesser, Timur Si Qin, Graham Wakefield, Marion Waller, Chris Younès.

Graphic design: M/M (Paris).
published in November 2017
bilingual edition (English / French)
17 x 24 cm (softcover, dust jacket)
496 pages (color ill.)
€29.00
ISBN: 978-2-9540969-7-1
EAN: 9782954096971
in stock
 
The fourth issue of the annual research book-magazine at the intersection of architecture, art and economy, explores the figure of the living as the key to contemporary challenges. Contributions by experts in different fields of knowledge offers the opportunity to rethink our relationship to the ecosystem and the new technologies, and to bring forward the essential notion of cohabitation.
Stream #04 explores the figure of the living as a key to contemporary challenges. For us to move beyond simply observing the Anthropocene era requires that we find a position from where to act, one that is above and beyond modern dualisms, by articulating new, paradoxical and sometimes antagonistic, relationships with the living. What appears to be inert reveals itself to be animated, the individual is revealed to be an ecosystem, the living becomes artificial and technology comes to life. In a time of great climatic disruption, repositioning oneself with respect to other forms of existence seems salutary. Our planet is alive; more than ever, to inhabit the world means to cohabit.
Taking the living into consideration, thinking and building with and for nature is our new frontier. Our contemporary condition is paradoxical: we have gained humility as Man, we no longer possess natural right and we fear the consequences of our acts, yet our situation forces us to consider means of intervening on the living.
According to what representation of nature, following which approaches, which methods and to what extent? Points of view and visions diverge, but the issues remain inspiring and the responses complex.
How to overcome modern dualisms? Does a philosophy of objects allow for new interactions? Is post-humanism a dead end? Does data reconfigure our experience of space? Reintegrating nature into the city? What Progress above and beyond technology? How to inhabit the digital city? What dynamics for an architecture of our surroundings? Towards a greater intelligence of the living? What frameworks to provide for the creation of artificial natures? Does technology allow symbiosis with the living? What place should be given to the uses and initiatives of citizens in the development of urban environments? What relays with urban biodiversity? The living as material or inspiration? How to develop concrete processes to give substance to the utopias of the metabolic city?
Stream is a biennial research book-magazine on the relationship between the world of production, contemporary art, design and architecture. Stream connects, links, creates a global platform between different environments.
Each issue of Stream is crossed by a common theme to all three sections of the journal: Production, Creation, Architecture. Stream presents findings from a current and critical analysis of the capitalist society, and of the worldwide contemporary changes which have given rise to new relations between capital and creation, the possibilities for further action and collaboration in its various fields of study.
Stream addresses contemporary questions through a multiplicity of contributions (essays, interviews and portfolios) from a variety of disciplines (philosophy, économy, geography or sociology…) and creative practices (contemporary art, design, experimental architecture…) to understand and shape the architecture and urbanism of tomorrow.