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Reiner Schürmann
 
Reiner Schürmann (1941–1993) was a German philosopher. He was born in Amsterdam and lived in Germany, Israel, and France before immigrating to the United States in the 1970s, where he was professor and director of the Department of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research in New York. He is the author of three books on philosophy: Heidegger on Being and Acting, Wandering Joy, and Broken Hegemonies. Origins is his only work of fiction. He never wrote nor published in his native German.
 

 
2020
English edition
Diaphanes
forthcoming
First of 29 volumes of Reiner Schürmann's so far unpublished lecture notes on the history of western thought, this publication traces the rise of self-consciousness in its modern form and function, with Luther as the central figure of Schürmann's study.

2019
English edition
Diaphanes
forthcoming
This volume of Reiner Schürmann's lectures unpacks Nietzsche's ambivalence towards Kant, in particular positioning Nietzsche's claim to have brought an end to German idealism against the backdrop of the Kantian transcendental-critical tradition.

2019
English edition
Diaphanes
This collection assembles key essays of Reiner Schürmann centering on the concepts of anarchy and the singularization to come. Setting out from the question of the status of practical philosophy at the end of metaphysics, these texts track the crucial role of Schürmann's engagement with the work of Michel Foucault between 1983 and 1991.

2017
French edition
Diaphanes
The posthumous publication of the German philosopher: a major work on the collapse of Western philosophy and on the necessity to rethink the past to build the future.

2016
English edition
Diaphanes
The semi-autobiographical account of the life of a young German in the 1960s, between Germany, Israel, and The United States. First translation of philosopher Reiner Schürmann's only literary work, originally published in French in 1976.

2013
French edition
Diaphanes
The relation between being and acting and the principle of anarchy in the philosophy of Martin Heidegger.